Month: June 2019

Crime Watch

THIEVES raided the University of Queensland’s Moreton Bay Research Station on Monday, August 27, while research centre residents were asleep.
Nanjing Night Net

Thieves entered the building through a sliding door between 10pm and 7am the following day and stole a mobile phone, wallet, laptop, television and its remote control.

Anyone who has any information about this or any of the crimes listed here is asked to contact Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000 or police at Capalaba on 3433 3333, Cleveland on 3824 9333, Redland Bay on 3829 4111, Dunwich on 3409 6020, Russell Island on 3409 1244 or Macleay Island on 3409 4722.

Alexandra Hills

A male student at the Alexandra Hills TAFE in Windemere Road was attacked by a man wearing a dark hoodie and dark sunglasses at noon on Monday, August 27. The student was walking in the TAFE grounds when the hooded man approached him and demanded his wallet. A police spokesperson said the hooded man then grabbed the student’s arm before a struggle broke out between them. The attacker left without the student’s wallet.

A car parked in Camira Street was broken into on Tuesday, August 28. A bag containing the owner’s wallet, medication and clothing was stolen. It is not known whether the car was locked.

Mount Cotton

A Holden utility stolen from a car park at a Capalaba mechanic’s workshop was found on Tuesday, August 28, on West Mount Cotton Road. Police said the car was seen in Logan several times before it was located at Mount Cotton.

Jewellery was stolen from a house in Spotted Gum Crescent during the early hours of Monday, August 27. It is unknown how the thieves entered the house.

Several hours later on Monday, August 27, thieves stole jewellery from a house in neighbouring Pendula Street. It is also unknown how the thieves entered the house.

Thornlands

An e-reader was stolen from a house in Kinross Road between 4am and 4.30am on Tuesday, August 28. It is unknown how the theives entered the house.

Burbank

A large amount of copper wire that was installed at a new set of traffic lights on Mount Cotton Road was stolen between 6.30pm and 7pm on Friday, August 24. Police said thieves isolated the power to the copper wire by removing several fuses. They then removed the copper wire by jemmying open several man holes.

Wakerley

A large number of tools and tyres were stolen from a tyre business in New Cleveland Road between 3pm and 7pm on Monday, August 27. The thieves jemmied open a door to steal the goods.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Physie girls show off fashions

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk at the weekend.
Nanjing Night Net

Head teacher, Sam Biggs, said the night was wonderful.

“We sold about 100 tickets which was double what we thought,” she said.

There were four, local clothing stores selling and advertising their products with five stores’ clothing being modelled by the physie girls.

“Everyone was really surprised of the clothing that was modelled and it gave everyone a chance to see that Moree does have good shopping stores,” Miss Biggs said.

The money raised was higher than anticipated.

“Thank you to everyone who helped us have a good night,” she said.

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

SEABL: CJ Massingale reaches 200th game

CJ Massingale. Picture: Gary SissonsALL signs point to a big night at Knox Stadium when revered Knox Raiders import CJ Massingale celebrates his 200th game tomorrow (April 14) at 8pm.
Nanjing Night Net

The Raiders will host Sandringham Sabres in the match which will see Massingale, who was named in the South East Australian Basketball League’s 30th anniversary side, reach a rare milestone for imported players.

It’s worth noting that Massingale hopes to soon lose his import title as he is heading towards Australian citizenship.

Massingale and the Raiders will come into the match hungry for a win after the Raiders dropped a special school holidays clash 87-84 against Dandenong Rangers at Dandenong Stadium last night.

After trailing 71-59 going into the final term, the Raiders fought back and took the lead behind the play of John Philip (20 points) and Lester Strong (18 points, nine rebounds, four blocks).

But just as the Raiders took the lead, the home side battled back with point guard Andrew Harms (23 points) making a tear-drop then some clutch free-throws to give his side a three-point lead with 11 seconds left.

As is so often the case, Massingale (19 points, nine rebounds), who had a quiet night, was left with the three-point shot which just missed handing the Rangers a surprising win.

Raiders coach Graham Longstaff said he expected a memorable performance from his star on such a big stage tomorrow night.

‘‘I’ve coached CJ for a long time now and I can’t remember him ever having two quiet games in a row,’’ Longstaff said.

‘‘His shots weren’t dropping tonight but he was playing good defence and passing the ball, that final shot wasn’t far off going in.’’

Longstaff also commended the Rangers on their defence which limited the usually potent Raiders offence.

‘‘We didn’t have a good night offensively,’’ Longstaff said.

‘‘But credit to Darren [Perry, Rangers coach] and his team, they played terrific defence and that was a factor.’’

Knox Raiders won their SEABL womens clash against Dandenong Rangers 65-54 last night.

New recruit Kelly Wilson, who plays for WNBL side Bendigo Spirit, continued her stellar start to the season with 30 points and nine rebounds while Odette Andrew added 11 points.

The Raiders women also play Sandringham Sabres before the men’s game tomorrow night with tip-off at 6pm.

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Take it to the limit

Top performer: Scoresby star Chris Hoegel will be joined by his brother Jayden this season. Picture: Wayne HawkinsKnox footy is going in hard. Roy Ward looks at the rise of professionalism in the leading clubs.
Nanjing Night Net

OF ALL the examples of the countless hours football people spend on their suburban club, one of Knox Falcons coach Jon Knight’s weekly ritual stands out.

Every Wednesday night, after his children and wife head to bed, Knight watches a few hours of game video, assessing his players, their opposition and whatever else catches his eye.

He then presents each player with weekly feedback on their performance and conducts a team video session each Thursday as part of the club’s final training session of the week.

‘‘The video reinforces what I’ve been saying to the players,’’ he says. If they are not in right spot then you put it on the player to explain where they should be. Most of the time it’s a positive, a really good visual example.’’

The footballing bar is forever being raised in the Knox area. The leading clubs, based so close together, have been fighting a cold war of sorts to become the first club to snatch the Eastern Football League division 1 premiership.

Scoresby has twice gone close in the past two seasons, making the grand final before falling to two-time premier Noble Park.

The Falcons made big strides last season moving into the finals under Knight while Rowville has a burgeoning group of younger players on its senior list and rising from their junior ranks. Another division 2 powerhouse, Bayswater, has one of the best grounds in the league and continues to press for elevation to division 1.

The area’s quality was demonstrated by the drafting of former St Simon’s Knights junior Jonathon Patton going No.1 in the 2011 AFL draft. But the ambition in the area can’t be measured by one big talent — it’s shown by the results on and off the field in the Eastern Football League.

Anyone viewing a Scoresby or Falcons game can see some noticeable, elite-level touches with both sides employing very structured, systematic game plans.

The Magpies’ coach over the past two seasons was Dale Bower, respected across the league for his professional game plan and management of the club.

His replacement this season is former Victorian Football League assistant coach Scott Whyte, who has made it clear he will keep the club on a similar path, recruiting former VFL star Jayden Hoegel and Pakenham premiership captain Jared Goldsack, brother of Collingwood player Tyson.

Whyte arrives with an elite football background and strong commendations for his ability to analyse the game.

He has implemented a fitness program designed for Matt Hunter, who has done similar work with AFL cub Carlton.

Whyte says he is impressed with the hard work players put into their preparation and recovery.

‘‘Compared to the VFL it’s not that far off at all,’’ he says. ‘‘Most nights of the week the guys are doing something like seeing a physio or hitting the gym.

‘‘The difference comes during the season because a lot of players come down from the VFL as they don’t want to train three times a week, so I try to keep our training to two nights.’’

Knight believes the professionalism of the football clubs across the area is driven by a number of things but, when it comes down to it, the level of commitment is due to club and individual pride: wanting to be the best.

‘‘100 per cent, it is about pride,’’ he says. ‘‘Players know if they aren’t hitting the gym and doing the work then they won’t play senior footy. At Knox, they certainly won’t.

‘‘It is a pride thing because no one wants to do this training and then play in the reserves.

‘‘Footy is now a 12-month commitment. There are even certain players you ask to bulk up over the off-season and some of our players have done that.

‘‘At clubs like Noble Park or Vermont or East Ringwood it’s no different: every player is doing that level of work now.’’

Knight had to advance his young side during last season forcing the adjustment from a less sophisticated style of play.

After some tough losses at the start of the season his methods paid off. The Falcons stormed into the finals with a young side, often with veteran Paul Tredrea the only player aged over 24.

Knight says coaching a young group made it easier to teach his structured style of football.

‘‘I thought it was a pretty easy job when the team is so young and keen. The players were saying they never really had a structure to how they played.

‘‘The side was sold on it and brought into it. Once we beat Vermont in round 4 we kicked on from there. Each player needs to know our whole team structure. Some players will play four or five positions.’’

The Falcons not only train three nights a week, they are also expected to regularly do gym sessions and receive weekly video analysis from their coaches about the previous week’s game.

In Knight’s eyes, playing or coaching top-level suburban footy is a year-long commitment and only for those who truly love the game.

‘‘All coaches love footy. You have to, otherwise you wouldn’t be doing it.’’

Players across all division 1 clubs and many division 2 sides, put in a 12-month effort.

In the case of the Falcons, Knight expects his players to all be gym members and continue training outside the team’s weekly Monday, Tuesday and Thursday sessions.

‘‘Ideally, you would train every night but you can’t have players doing that when they work and study. But I would expect our players would do running or swimming or go to the gym on Wednesdays and Sundays.’’

Overall, the level of training has lifted the division 1 competition to higher levels and attracted more former AFL and VFL players into the league.

‘‘I reckon there is a big divide between second and first divisions,” Knight says.

‘‘Every division 1 side I saw last season was very organised and had a huge amount of support.

‘‘We are lucky at Knox in that way. When you see how many people stand out there each week and help the club, it’s a massive effort.’’