Shock $4.8m super bill

WELLINGTON Shire Council has been hit with a $4.8 million unfunded superannuation bill.
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The council has been required to make the $4.8 million top-up payment to the Local Authorities Superannuation Fund, defined benefit plan.

In an effort to reduce its future superannuation burden, council has joined a local government push for legislative reform.

Shire mayor Peter Cleary said council had been informed that a payment would be required; but had received little warning of its magnitude.

“It would be fair to say that the size of this most recent top-up payment has caught the entire local government sector by surprise,” he said.

While the Local Government Defined Benefit Scheme was closed to new members in 1993, current State and Federal laws require the scheme to hold enough funds to meet the retirement benefits owed to members now and in the future.

Cr Cleary said that state and federal superannuation schemes carried an exemption from such onerous funding liabilities.

“Wellington Shire Council believes that it is unreasonable to expect local government to meet a higher funding requirement,” he said.

“Local government receives just over 3.5 per cent of all rates and tax revenue, the State Government receives 16.4 per cent and the Federal Government a considerable 80.1 per cent.

“Clearly the expectation that we provide more funding than our state and federal counterparts from a comparatively smaller funding bucket is unrealistic as a long term proposition,” Cr Cleary said.

“The legacy of the defined benefits plan creates a volatile system which translates into long term financial challenges for all councils.

“For large rural shires it is particularly difficult as we balance the demands of a large ageing asset base, the community’s desire for new infrastructure with an aspiration for lower rates.”

For more read Friday’s Gippsland Times.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

A dramatic day that he will never forget

OBERON’S seniorConstable Adrian Graham has been in the NSW Police Force for a decade, butWednesday’s dramatic rescueis something he could never have contemplated.
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However, his role in helping rescue a trapped toddler from an upturned vehicle in the Macquarie River shows the dedication and commitment of the force’s serving officers.

Playing down talk of being a hero after being pictured on the front page of yesterday’s Western Advocate, the local detective told how he was making some routine inquiries in the CBD when things turned to mayhem.

“The police radio came on and said a car had gone off the bridge at Ego and that people were trapped inside,” he said.

“We were the first police on the scene and there were two people in the river next to the upturned vehicle. We learned that there could be a couple of children trapped inside it.

“It turned out they were the driver of the vehicle and apasser by who was there at the time. People were on the bank of the river frantic at what was happening while the people in the river were calling for a knife to get the child out as it was stuck by the arm.

“I managed to get a pocket knife from a farmer who was there burning willows and waded out to the vehicle and handed it to the boy’s father.

“It seemed like forever, but it took about five minutes before he was freed. The water was really cold and it was really starting to get uncomfortable out there.”

Sen Const Graham, 39, said when he heard the young fella let out a few whimpers there was a feeling of great relief.

“Thank goodness, he was still alive,” he said. “While all that was going on two other colleagues (Sen Const Kelly Gregori and Sen Const Nathan Snow-Jones) arrived and they both came into the water.

“I’d been yelling at them to get rescue and more help. I remember they’d grabbed some sort of a tarp because we thought it could help shield the water a bit. I don’t really remember exactly.

“It was all a blur. We all just reacted the best we could.”

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Sen Const Graham said that when the toddler was finally out of the vehicle the bystander who came to help carried him to the bank and into the waiting arms of the paramedics.

“He wasn’t letting go of that kiddie for anything,” he said.

“Knowing what we do today, that bloke is a true hero. I will certainly be recommending that he deserves some form of recognition.”

CALMER WATERS: Senior Constable Adrian Graham back at the Macquarie River near Eglinton yesterday. Photo: BRIAN WOOD 082312bwadrian1082312bwadrian1

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Eagles play wounded Parrots

MAFFRA can set-up a third “Battle of the Birds” this season with victory over Leongatha in tomorrow’s Gippsland League football qualifying final.
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Victory over Traralgon last weekend afforded the Eagles the luxury of the double chance during the finals. Defeat the Parrots tomorrow at Morwell and the Eagles will meet minor premier Sale in the second semi-final.

The Eagles were superb in the second half against Traralgon, showing superior skill, fitness and ability to adjust to the cross breeze at the Maffra Recreation Rerserve. The Eagles punished the Maroons’ early inaccuracy in front of goal to win by 41 points.

Maffra’s defence was a key to the victory, weathering the early storm against Traralgon’s potent forward line, which failed to fire. Tomorrow it will face Jake Best and Dwayne Holt, who will be keen to return to form after disappointing showings against Sale on Saturday night.

The Parrots put in a shocker against Sale, failing to kick a goal, with the evening conditions and a miserly Magpies’ defence not helping their cause.

The Parrots won both meetings against Maffra this year, ending a run of 22 losses to the Eagles. The Parrots were too strong at Maffra, but the Eagles pushed them at home in round 13.

Leongatha’s back line could be tested by the in-form Daniel Bedggood and Adrian Burgiel, who is finding touch after a long lay-off through injury.

The Parrots’ midfield will need to stop Hayden Burgiel, Ben Coleman, Gary Jones and Kel Porter from getting the ball forward.

LATROBE Valley rivals Traralgon and Morwell will meet in the elimination final at Traralgon on Sunday.

Both teams head into the clash off losses.

The Tigers were, with the exception of Sale, the competition’s form side during the middle of the year, winning seven matches, losing one and drawing another between rounds six and 14 to see it push for a top three spot, but since then have won just one of their past four games.

For three quarters against Drouin, the Tigers didn’t have any fit players on the bench with key position players Daniel Hutchinson (corked thigh) and Shane Ryan (back injury) not returning to the field to protect them for this weekend.

Players such as Adam Bailey and Mannon Johnston are likely to miss.

The Tigers perhaps should have won as they played possession football for the final minute with them ahead on the scoreboard, trouble was the scoreboard was incorrect with the Hawks winning by three points.

Traralgon was seemingly set for another top three finish, after winning five of six matches before its heavy loss at Maffra had the Maroons coaching staff heading back to the drawing board.

The Maroons wasted opportunities early to get away from the Eagles, before the home side found the right gear and overran the Maroons. Traralgon was missing the drive of Danny Campbell, whose season was ended by a four-match penalty arising from the Maroon’s win over Morwell.

For more read Friday’s Gippsland Times.

Gippsland League finals draw:

Qualifying finals, Saturday at Morwell:

Football, seniors: Leongatha v Maffra, 2.20pm; reserves: Sale v Maffra, 12.30pm; under 18s: Traralgon v Warragul, 10.45am; under 16s: Sale v Maffra, 9am.

Netball, A grade: Drouin v Traralgon, 2.15pm; B grade: Traralgon v Drouin, 1pm; C grade: Morwell v Leongatha, noon; under 17s: Sale v Maffra, 11am; under 15s: Sale v Wonthaggi, 10am; under 13s: Sale v Wonthaggi, 9am.

Elimination finals, Sunday at Traralgon:

Football, seniors: Traralgon v Morwell, 2.20pm; reserves: Wonthaggi v Morwell, 12.30pm; under 18s: Wonthaggi v Sale, 10.45am; under 16s: Bairnsdale v Drouin, 9am.

Netball, A grade: Wonthaggi v Sale, 2.15pm; B grade: Morwell v Maffra, 1pm; C grade: Bairnsdale v Drouin, noon; under 17s: Bairnsdale v Wonthaggi, 11am; under 15s: Maffra v Drouin, 10am; under 13s: Bairnsdale v Maffra, 9am.

Maffra will meet Leongatha in the Gippsland League qualifying final tomorrow.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Blues, Roos set for classic contest

ROSEDALE and Heyfield will tomorrow square off in the North Gippsland football second semi-final at Glengarry with the winner advancing to the grand final.
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There could be mixed emotions for Rosedale coach Damien Birss, who is a four-time premiership player with Heyfield.

Kangaroos president John Tyquin said while he was a huge part of the club, come tomorrow Birss would not be “a Heyfield person”.

“He becomes the enemy until after the contest,” Tyquin said.

The Blues have been at the forefront of the competition all season, finishing one game clear of nearest rival Sale City, with Heyfield a further game behind.

In round 10, the Blues ended Heyfield’s five-game winning streak with a blistering 80-point victory. While there was plenty of hype and hope surrounding that contest, it failed to live up to all expectations with Rosedale on song from the opening bounce.

Having also won their round one clash by 20 goals, the Blues have had the wood over the Kangaroos this year.

Tyquin wasn’t worried by past results, but was confident the young side had further matured throughout the season.

“The young guys have grown and matured as the year has gone on, with such a very young group you don’t know what you are going to get each week,” he said.

“We played Rosedale on both occasions relatively early on in the season, some nine weeks have passed and the side have further developed.”

Speaking on behalf of coach Adrian Cox, the man at the helm of the club was realistic of the enormity of the challenge.

FOR the first time in three seasons, two-time reigning premier Sale City finds itself having to navigate a different path if it’s to claim the premiership again.

Before they can look too far ahead, the Bulldogs will this Sunday need to halt Cowwarr, who has won its past seven games, including a five-point thriller in the elimination final against Glengarry.

The Saints have won nine of their past 10 matches, having accounted for fellow finalists Rosedale, Heyfield and Sale City during the second half of the season.

Saints Coach Cory Bannister would be fully aware past results would mean little ahead of the first semi-final at Churchill.

His opposite number at the Bulldogs, Nick Hider, was disappointed with his side’s qualifying final loss to Heyfield.

“We were beaten in a fair few areas of the game, that we pride ourselves on,” he said.

“We couldn’t hold on in the last quarter when they got a run on, the game was on the line and they wanted it more which was disappointing.

“It is going to be tough from here, we have to get over Cowwarr. We cant look too far ahead just taking it one week at a time.”

Hider said his side needed to get back to basics on the training track this week if it was to counteract the Saints.

“We have to improve in several areas. Our attack on the contested footy is one of those areas, when the ball is in dispute we need to get our hands dirty and get in there,” he said.

“It’s really the fundamentals that we need to improve in – back to basics, our run and carry of the ball. We need to use our skills, stick our tackles and get our hands on the footy first.

“Our genuine ball winners are not in form, they haven’t been for weeks. As a club we need to stand up when our backs are against the wall.”

For more read Friday’s Gippsland Times.

NGFNL finals draw:

Second semi-finals, Saturday at Glengarry:

Football, seniors: Rosedale v Heyfield, 2.15pm; reserves: Heyfield v Sale City, noon; thirds: Sale City v TTU, 9.45am.

Netball, A grade: Rosedale v Churchill, 2.15pm; B grade: Rosedale v TTU, 1pm; C grade: Gormandale v Woodside, 11.45am; D grade: Glengarry v Rosedale, 10.30am; under 17s: TTU v Glengarry, 9.30am.

First semi-finals, Sunday at Churchill:

Football, seniors: Sale City v Cowwarr, 2.15pm; reserves: Rosedale v Churchill, noon; thirds: Woodside v Churchill, 9.45am.

Netball, A grade: TTU V Glengarry, 2.15pm; B grade: Gormandale v Glengarry, 1pm; C grade: Sale City v Rosedale, 11.45am; D grade: TTU v Gormandale, 10.30am; under 17s: Heyfield v Sale City, 9.30am.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Abbott’s compo call for Hunter’s Bali victims

OPPOSITION leader Tony Abbott has appealed to the federal government to make payments for Australian terrorism victims retrospective to provide support to survivors of the Bali bombings.
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Newcastle lawyer Paul Anicich, who along with his wife was seriously injured in the 2005 Bali bombing, joined Mr Abbott at a press conference this morning.

Mr Abbott said he had again written to the Prime Minister urging that the government extend retrospectively a scheme that provides payments of up to $75,000 to survivors and next of kin of any Australians killed in overseas terrorism attacks.

He said that would provide support to victims ‘‘of Bali in 2002, the victims of Bali in 2005, the Australian victims of the World Trade Centre atrocity, the London bombings, the two Jakarta bombings have not received any compensation over and above the medical expenses that were dealt with at the time’’.

‘‘I think it would be a mean-spirited nation that would refuse this kind of modest assistance to the Australian victims of terrorism or their next of kin,’’ Mr Abbott said.

‘‘If it’s right and proper, as I believe it is, for the victims of domestic crime to be assisted in this way I think it’s right and proper for the victims of overseas terrorism to be assisted in this way.’’

He said he hoped the government would act ahead of the 10th anniversary in October of the 2002 Bali bombings.

If not, he would pursue the matter in parliament when it resumes next month.

Mr Abbott had worked with Mr Anicich to lobby for the payments, and introduced a private members bill in 2009.

The government subsequently amended laws to enable payments but said it was not appropriate to make the bill retrospective and criticised the former Howard government for not acting at the time of the bombings.

Three of those killed in the 2005 Bali bombing – Jennifer Williamson, Fiona Zwolinski and Colin Zwolinski – were from the Hunter.

‘‘I happened to be in Bali with my family on holiday at the time of the 2005 bombing and spent a fair bit of time on that terrible day with Paul’s wife Peny and the other Australian victims before they were airlifted out later that evening,’’ Mr Abbott said.

Mr Anicich said ‘‘I thought immediately of the children of the people who were with me and were killed who I thought could just get a little kick along in life if this scheme was approved’’.

‘‘I only think of them and think every day this must be on their minds when they awake that they’re the victims of this tragedy. It must be so tough on them.’’

Tony Abbott.

Council approves restructure

REDLAND City Council has abolished its City Enterprises group and the position of its manager Elissa Underhill in a corporate structure overhaul aimed at cutting costs.
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The group was a section of the City Services department run by general manager Louise Rusan.

Under the restructure, approved at this week’s general meeting, Redland Water and Waste, headed by Gary Soutar, will oversee waste management, previously the domain of City Services.

Business and Tourism Support Services will be merged with the Economic Development group.

The restructure was approved alongside a revised budget, which found an extra $5.1million in savings.

According to an officer report, overhauling the City Services department would save ratepayers up to $2.23million.

The report claimed the council had found real “net cash” savings of $190,000.

The council said thesavings and cash position were separate and “for simplicity of explanation” a saving “gain of $1.1million could be seen as offsetting the cash position from carry over budgetitems”.

Mayor Karen Williams said there was “no smoke and mirrors” in the savings, and officers had budgeted for the abolition of tip fees to cost more than it had.

“Before we even started, we had to find an extra $4million to meet our budget, so officers re-looked at what they could do more effectively with less money,” she said.

“That $5.1million will be realised within the next quarter.

“It turned out that abolishing gate fees at the tip wasn’t that expensive and so we were able to count that budgeted money as savings,” she said.

At this week’s full council meeting, councillor Craig Ogilvie said the $4million of savings was found in paring back expenditure on goods and services from $104million to$100million.

“But that is still $11million higher than what the previous councilforecast in its previous financial strategy,” Cr Ogilvie said after the meeting.

He said the projected goods and services expenditure budgethad been$89million.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Social housing concern in Knox

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TWO years ago, Ray’s life changed dramatically when, after the death of his wife, he was forced to give up work to care full-time for his son with cerebral palsy.

He could no longer meet the mortgage repayments, and as they were moving out, the removalist truck carrying all his family’s belongings crashed.

Ray, who did not want his surname published, said his family moved into a rooming house but despite his son being in a wheelchair, they were placed in an upstairs room.

Thankfully, Uniting Care Harrison came to his aid and helped find his family emergency accommodation in Knox.

“It’s impossible to find suitable housing in the area. A rental property might cost $300 a week, and I only receive $500 from Centrelink,” he said. “If it wasn’t for Uniting Care, we would have been on the street.”

It was revealed at last month’s Knox Council meeting there were just five new social housing dwellings approved in Knox last year.

The council estimates 95 dwellings need to be approved per year between 2010-15 for supply to match need. It was the first housing report since the council officially defined social and affordable housing in a research paper in January.

The paper recommended a five-year timeframe be used to calculate the annual minimum supply of social housing in Knox to meet the housing needs for disadvantaged residents by 2015.

Uniting Care Harrison homelessness services general manager Mark Dixon said it was not just a lack of social housing that was a concern, but affordable private rentals and public housing. He told the Weekly more than 1600 families, couples or singles contacted his office for help last year.

“We’re not meeting the demands for this sort of housing and they’re ending up in rooming houses,” he said.

If Knox residents were concerned about social housing in their vicinity, they should look at the design of the mixed tenancy development, including social housing, at the corner of Ferntree Gully and Dorset roads.

The council decided to seek a meeting with Housing Minister Wendy Lovell to discuss the shortage of social housing in Knox.

Crime Watch

THIEVES raided the University of Queensland’s Moreton Bay Research Station on Monday, August 27, while research centre residents were asleep.
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Thieves entered the building through a sliding door between 10pm and 7am the following day and stole a mobile phone, wallet, laptop, television and its remote control.

Anyone who has any information about this or any of the crimes listed here is asked to contact Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000 or police at Capalaba on 3433 3333, Cleveland on 3824 9333, Redland Bay on 3829 4111, Dunwich on 3409 6020, Russell Island on 3409 1244 or Macleay Island on 3409 4722.

Alexandra Hills

A male student at the Alexandra Hills TAFE in Windemere Road was attacked by a man wearing a dark hoodie and dark sunglasses at noon on Monday, August 27. The student was walking in the TAFE grounds when the hooded man approached him and demanded his wallet. A police spokesperson said the hooded man then grabbed the student’s arm before a struggle broke out between them. The attacker left without the student’s wallet.

A car parked in Camira Street was broken into on Tuesday, August 28. A bag containing the owner’s wallet, medication and clothing was stolen. It is not known whether the car was locked.

Mount Cotton

A Holden utility stolen from a car park at a Capalaba mechanic’s workshop was found on Tuesday, August 28, on West Mount Cotton Road. Police said the car was seen in Logan several times before it was located at Mount Cotton.

Jewellery was stolen from a house in Spotted Gum Crescent during the early hours of Monday, August 27. It is unknown how the thieves entered the house.

Several hours later on Monday, August 27, thieves stole jewellery from a house in neighbouring Pendula Street. It is also unknown how the thieves entered the house.

Thornlands

An e-reader was stolen from a house in Kinross Road between 4am and 4.30am on Tuesday, August 28. It is unknown how the theives entered the house.

Burbank

A large amount of copper wire that was installed at a new set of traffic lights on Mount Cotton Road was stolen between 6.30pm and 7pm on Friday, August 24. Police said thieves isolated the power to the copper wire by removing several fuses. They then removed the copper wire by jemmying open several man holes.

Wakerley

A large number of tools and tyres were stolen from a tyre business in New Cleveland Road between 3pm and 7pm on Monday, August 27. The thieves jemmied open a door to steal the goods.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Physie girls show off fashions

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk at the weekend.
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Head teacher, Sam Biggs, said the night was wonderful.

“We sold about 100 tickets which was double what we thought,” she said.

There were four, local clothing stores selling and advertising their products with five stores’ clothing being modelled by the physie girls.

“Everyone was really surprised of the clothing that was modelled and it gave everyone a chance to see that Moree does have good shopping stores,” Miss Biggs said.

The money raised was higher than anticipated.

“Thank you to everyone who helped us have a good night,” she said.

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

MOREE Physical Culture strutted their stuff on the catwalk

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

SEABL: CJ Massingale reaches 200th game

CJ Massingale. Picture: Gary SissonsALL signs point to a big night at Knox Stadium when revered Knox Raiders import CJ Massingale celebrates his 200th game tomorrow (April 14) at 8pm.
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The Raiders will host Sandringham Sabres in the match which will see Massingale, who was named in the South East Australian Basketball League’s 30th anniversary side, reach a rare milestone for imported players.

It’s worth noting that Massingale hopes to soon lose his import title as he is heading towards Australian citizenship.

Massingale and the Raiders will come into the match hungry for a win after the Raiders dropped a special school holidays clash 87-84 against Dandenong Rangers at Dandenong Stadium last night.

After trailing 71-59 going into the final term, the Raiders fought back and took the lead behind the play of John Philip (20 points) and Lester Strong (18 points, nine rebounds, four blocks).

But just as the Raiders took the lead, the home side battled back with point guard Andrew Harms (23 points) making a tear-drop then some clutch free-throws to give his side a three-point lead with 11 seconds left.

As is so often the case, Massingale (19 points, nine rebounds), who had a quiet night, was left with the three-point shot which just missed handing the Rangers a surprising win.

Raiders coach Graham Longstaff said he expected a memorable performance from his star on such a big stage tomorrow night.

‘‘I’ve coached CJ for a long time now and I can’t remember him ever having two quiet games in a row,’’ Longstaff said.

‘‘His shots weren’t dropping tonight but he was playing good defence and passing the ball, that final shot wasn’t far off going in.’’

Longstaff also commended the Rangers on their defence which limited the usually potent Raiders offence.

‘‘We didn’t have a good night offensively,’’ Longstaff said.

‘‘But credit to Darren [Perry, Rangers coach] and his team, they played terrific defence and that was a factor.’’

Knox Raiders won their SEABL womens clash against Dandenong Rangers 65-54 last night.

New recruit Kelly Wilson, who plays for WNBL side Bendigo Spirit, continued her stellar start to the season with 30 points and nine rebounds while Odette Andrew added 11 points.

The Raiders women also play Sandringham Sabres before the men’s game tomorrow night with tip-off at 6pm.

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